Discover your Listening Villain
Apple Award Winning Podcast
Podcast Episode 084: How to listen when you disagree

Subscribe to the podcast

Juliana Tafur is an award-winning trilingual filmmaker, producer and director. She owns Orkidea Films and Story Powerhouse, which are devoted to the development and execution of compelling TV and film projects, including LIST(e)N – a feature length documentary which highlights our common humanity amidst the growing polarization in the U.S.A

During this discussion Juliana and I explore that listening is the willingness to have your mind changed.

Juliana’s 90 minute documentary Listen where two people with different perspectives on abortion, guns and immigration are brought together to listen to each other.

Listen carefully as Juliana describes in very careful and thoughtful detail how people show up when they are willing to listen and when they are not.

Do you think you interrupt a lot when you listen, most people don’t think they interrupt – yet speakers say it’s the most frustrating thing about listeners – listen carefully when Juliana describes what interrupting shows up in listening.

Finally, great listening environments can be defined – Juliana skilfully and elegantly creates an environment where people can be open to listening.

Transcript

Podcast Episode 084 – How to listen when you disagree

Oscar Trimboli: 

How do you listen when you disagree? Today, you’ll find out how to do it and why it matters more than ever. Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words. Good day. I’m Oscar Trimboli, and this is the Apple award-winning podcast Deep Listening, designed to move you from a distracted listener to a deep and impactful leader. Did you know you spend 55% of your day listening, yet only 2% of people have ever been taught how? In each episode, we explore the five levels of listening. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Communication is 50% speaking and 50% listening. Yet as a leader, you’re taught only the importance of communication from the perspective of how to speak. It’s critical you start to build some muscles for the next phase in how to listen. The cost of not listening, it’s confusion. It’s conflict. It’s projects running over schedule. It’s lost customers. It’s great employees that leave before they want to. When you implement the strategies, the tips, and tactics that you’ll hear, you’ll get four hours a week back in your schedule. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

I wonder what you could do with an extra four hours a week. Juliana Tafur is an award-winning trilingual filmmaker, producer, and director. She’s devoted her time to creating compelling documentaries, including the feature length documentary Listen, which highlights what’s common in humans amidst the growing polarisation in the United States of America. During this discussion with Juliana and I, we explore that listening is the willingness to have your mind changed. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Juliana’s 90minute documentary, Listen, brings two people together with different perspectives on the topics of abortion, guns, and immigration, and they’re brought together so they can be open to listen to each other.  Listen carefully as Juliana describes in thoughtful detail how people show up when they’re willing to listen and when they’re not. Do you think you interrupt a lot when you listen? Most people don’t. They think they’re great listeners, yet speakers say it’s the most frustrating thing about people who listen to them. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

That’s why I’d like you to listen carefully when Juliana describes what interrupting shows up like in a conversation. If you’d like to learn what gets in the way of your listening, visit listeningquiz.com and take the seven minuteassessment, and you’ll receive a tailored report and an action plan that progresses your listening. Visit listening quiz.com and join over three and a half thousand people who have already completed the quiz and the 90 day challenge. Finally, great listening environments can be defined. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Juliana skillfully and elegantly creates an environment where people can be open to listen. Let’s listen to Juliana. 

Juliana Tafur: 

When we say what frustrates me when people don’t listen, it’s the opposite, like when do people truly listen? What frustrates me the most is that people don’t listen enough. That the quality of listening is not what it should be. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

What do you struggle with when it comes to your listening? 

Juliana Tafur: 

I struggled with listening to myself. It was something that I needed to make myself aware of, because I was launching a university tour about listening. And then I was hoping that all the stars would align and that I could continue doing that, because I felt that it was very much a calling. But yet again, I was torn as to, well, is this going to be sustainable? And it wasn’t sustainable up until the point where I said, wait a second, do you have to listen to yourself? 

Juliana Tafur: 

And I began doing that soul searching and I realised that I had to just give into it and that things would come together. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

What prompted you to go, “Now is the time that I need to make this film?” 

Juliana Tafur: 

Well, I’ll take you back to the elections in the US four years ago and how unpleasant it was to see all the hatred and polarisation and division that was coming to the surface. 

Male Audio: 

I don’t know what I said off. I don’t remember. 

Female Audio: 

What I call the basket of deplorables. 

Juliana Tafur: 

And I began questioning all of this that was happening around me and how much I wanted to make an impact and do something about this. It must be possible for people to connect at a human level even if they disagree. I’m not out to have people change their perceptions on some of the toughest issues of our time. In the case of the documentary, I chose guns, abortion, and immigration. And I knew that people wouldn’t change their perceptions, but I did want to take away that element of hatred and judgement . 

Juliana Tafur: 

I wanted to take away kind of the ugliness out of it. I knew that everyone has a story and everyone has a reason as to why they believe what they believe. And through the process, I also wanted to hear the other side and see what they had to say and see if I could connect. I knew that that experience was possible, but I obviously had no guarantees with the people that we chose. 

Juliana Tafur: 

The people have extremely personal stories that are all connected to the issues at hand, starting with a survivor of a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, two ladies who have each had abortions and one regretted it and the other one didn’t, another case was immigration and both of the participants were immigrants, but one was opposed to illegal immigration and the other one was an undocumented immigrant. That’s what led me to do the film. And what I encountered in the process was truly remarkable. 

Juliana Tafur: 

In two out of the three cases, the participants did connect and were able to understand the other side and put those differences aside. But I realised in the making of it that those who were able to connect were the ones who listened to each other. To me, this was fascinating. I was not doing the film thinking that that would be the case. As a result of this, I titled the film Listen. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

What did you learn about listening yourself through that process? 

Juliana Tafur: 

What I learned in that process is that not everyone was ready to listen. A lot of people told me that they were too angry to do this because I was upfront explaining to people that the idea of the film would be to have people connect at a human level without saying much more. I wasn’t telling them anything about the potential kind of counterpart or their story or what I was seeking, but I did make it clear that can you go into this conversation and into the filmmaking process at least with an open mind that the other person may have something to say. 

Juliana Tafur: 

You’re not going to change your opinion, but just that you’re willing to hear them out. And many people said, “I am too angry. You’re not going to get from me what you’re looking for.” And that was quite surprising. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

And thinking about the process about selection, listening is the willingness to have your mind changed. 

Juliana Tafur: 

My own listening process is I was casting participants. The main thing for me was how do I find two sides that are balanced? And I think that was my biggest challenge in I would say listening to my intuition, if you will, to the journalist in me. And as a filmmaker, I can cast two people whose stories are not balanced. And as a result, I could have the outcome that I wish. I mean, everyone knows that that’s possible, but I want it to be fair to all my participants, regardless of where I stood on the issues. 

Juliana Tafur: 

I had to more than anything listen to the journalist in me and say, “Okay. On one end, I have a survivor of the school shooting that has a really strong story. And on the other end, I need to have someone with an equally powerful story.” And in the case of guns, that ended up being a man who’s the owner of an online portal that sells and trades firearms, but it turns out he also has muscular dystrophy. So for him, having a firearm is the way to level the playing field. It’s the way he feels he can protect his wife and his daughters in a rural city in America. 

Juliana Tafur: 

The story of pro-life, pro-choice, I have them each share why they believe what they believe. And in that case, the pro-life lady, her name is Towanna, Towanna began explaining how she was young and she didn’t know what she was doing. And she was 16 or 17, and she had a boyfriend. And she ended up getting pregnant, and she wanted the child, but she didn’t know what she was doing. And she ended up having an abortion. She very much regretted it years after. She thought it was the right thing when she did it. 

Juliana Tafur: 

It turns out that she had some complications resulting from the abortion and she couldn’t have any more kids. She’s become an activist and very vocal about her experience. And she tries to get other women not to do what she did, because she thinks she was wrong in doing what she did. And that’s her belief and perception. And then on the other side, we have Linda who is very much pro-choice, and Linda walks us through her story and it’s a story filled with abuse. Her story is so personal. 

Juliana Tafur: 

She ends up being coerced into a sexual relationship with a man in the music industry who had lured her to go sing in one of the major music studios in Miami. He basically told her that she had to do this in order to continue. As someone who was trying to get a better life, she thought she had no choice and she proceeded. And she ended up getting pregnant and then couldn’t do anything about it, except for deciding to not have a child. That was her decision and that’s what moulds today also her perception on why women need to have a choice. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Your skill as a filmmaker is extraordinary. I’d love you to take us in, Juliana, to one or two of these stories and paint the picture of what happened when these people met. Because up until that point, they didn’t know each other, and they came together in unusual situation. It’s rare for people to meet in front of the camera. And that requires probably an opportunity for you to help settle them in and make them relax. Immediately before the filming takes place, how did that work so that you created a kind of optimal listening situation for when you were filming? 

Juliana Tafur: 

The people did not know each other, and I on purpose did not have a meet because I didn’t want them to share much of their life with each other before we could be recording the entire experience in front of the camera. I knew their stories. I had obviously met them and talked to them at length. I guided them to an experience in the initial phase where they shared each other’s ideas or viewpoints on the issues exclusively without sharing much of their personal background or why they believe what they believe. And that was phase one. 

Juliana Tafur: 

And then phase two, I have them go into an art shop, like a do your own art shop. And through painting, I had them kind of break that ice of transcending the issues, if you will, and have them paint a moment or something that exemplified why they believed what they believe. It was through that moment after they did their paintings that I have them turn their paintings around and share them with each other. Then they went deep into their stories. And on the third encounte,I have them… After they’ve shared their very personal stories, I have them meet again. 

Juliana Tafur: 

And then the idea with that last meetup was to either get everything else that they hadn’t said that they felt that had to be said out or show anything else that they thought they needed to show. Obviously, my goal here was to have them come together somehow. I ended up using letters, having them each write a letter to the other about what they saw in the other that they could potentially appreciate. Through that, I was able to create beautiful connection. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

I’m curious to explore what you noticed was happening when people were truly listening to each other. What were the characteristics of how they sat, how they paused, how they listened intently, how they did or didn’t interrupt when people were truly listening and also when they weren’t? I’m curious what you were noticing in their listening. 

Juliana Tafur: 

In the first encounter where people are just discussing the issues, you could clearly see that, yes, they’re interrupting. They’re trying to make sure that their position is being heard, that they’re coming across stronger with a better story, with a better argument. You could see that people even felt a need to write down what the other was saying so that they could respond. So very on the defensive when they were not listening. The conversations were filled with interruptions, and you spoke and now it’s my turn, and that sort of thing. 

Juliana Tafur: 

People are just more tense obviously. Their whole body is almost like crouched forward and their faces are tense. And when they were listening, truly listening, you could just see them relaxed. You could see their postures change. You could see they were no longer with an agenda as to what they had to say, but they wanted to intently hear what the other person was saying. 

Juliana Tafur: 

That is one of the strongest barriers to listening when we are trying to prove our point and have an agenda as to what we have to say and need to say and how we need to sound better and stronger, as opposed to just being there for the other person and hearing them out. At the end, when they really, really kind of broke, I would say… I call them broke because especially on the pro-life, pro-choice case, they were very up in arms, even in the final encounter, and I did not think that they were going to come together. 

Juliana Tafur: 

But there is a moment there where they both give in, and one of them especially acknowledges the pain and the suffering of the other. And it was in that moment that the other… And she says it in the film, she says she was able to kind of breath again. She says, “We went… Ah. We can finally hear each other out.” It was when she understood that or she admitted that she understood and could connect deeply with the pain that she had gone through, the other had gone through. 

Juliana Tafur: 

That was just a beautiful moment because when that happened, when that connection through the pain happened and they realised that the most important thing there was just to be there for one another because they had each gone through immense pain and suffering in their own ways, then they really let their agendas down and their points and arguments down and they began to hear each other out. And then when they were praising each other, it was real. It was from the heart. It was sincere. 

Juliana Tafur: 

They exemplified compassion, understanding, presence, just deep listening. It was truly beautiful. Being there in that room with them was just amazing. It was the highlight of the whole filmmaking process, and I was happy I could document that. I could show that people with such strong polar opposite viewpoints could connect. Thankfully it’s there for the world to see, because I don’t think that happens every day, but I’m grateful that it did happen with Linda and Towanna, and I am hopeful that it can happen with more people when they realise what is needed for deep listening. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Do you think they both had their minds and being open to have their minds changed? 

Juliana Tafur: 

They both realised that there was something they could learn from the other and respect from the other. Although their viewpoints or positions on these issues rather remained unchanged because they’re still going about their lives, pro-choice, pro-life, they did understand that there was something about the other’s position that they had never seen before. And they understood that they could connect at a human level with someone who perhaps before beginning the experience they would have said, “I can’t connect or I even despise.” 

Juliana Tafur: 

That judgement , like ugly judgement , that ugly hatred of this person believes this and they can never be my friend was taken away. And that was really what I had expected of the whole experience and it was beautiful to see, because they did go out hugging and saying, “We’re going to meet up again.” 

Oscar Trimboli: 

We learn a lot from strengths and positive examples. Equally, Juliana, we learn a lot from failures and mistakes. I’m curious to explore the absence of listening as it relates to the immigration scenario. 

Juliana Tafur: 

One of the participants in the immigration case stood up and left. I don’t want to judge him because he may have his reasons for it. We all have reasons for our actions. I know his story is also complex. As a Syrian immigrant, he is genuinely fearful of things, especially he’s fearful of Islamic groups coming to this country. And that’s something he expresses and that’s made him fearful of many things, including immigrants from South of the border, South of the US border, and he has his theories as to what mass immigration can do to America. 

Juliana Tafur: 

Those are his reasons. And I try to remain balanced as well even after seeing the outcome. But that said, he was indeed a little bit more hesitant than the other participants to continue through with a discussion. Mainly because he just could not understand why someone would believe that giving an opportunity to other immigrants across the border was going to lead to anything good for America. 

Juliana Tafur: 

As far as listening, what I noticed with him is that he kept repeating his same arguments and he would not let the other participant, who had very valid arguments and is an undocumented immigrant, but has since become a lawyer in the State of Florida, he would just not hear out her arguments. And there was no listening as a result of that. Nothing. The conversation just couldn’t progress. The biggest obstacle to listening is when you keep repeating your own points and you’re just not open to hear the story, the personal story of the other person. 

Juliana Tafur: 

The idea was not to have these people change their perceptions, but to hear each other out. But when that listening part is not in the equation, we were just not going to advance. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Is there a moment from the films you’ve already shown where there’s a specific audience member reaction that you noticed or saw or were able to hear about after the event that really touched you? 

Juliana Tafur: 

I oftentimes see a lot of tears when people are exchanging their art and talking about their personal, deeply personal, stories. Their stories that are not easy to hear. And when you hear them, regardless of what side you stand on, you go, “Oh, okay. That’s different. I get it. I understand.” Also, what I get from people when they see the movie, at the end, they tell me, “Thank you because you made me listen.” Through watching the movie, people are listening. And that’s what’s powerful about it. 

Juliana Tafur: 

That it’s a movie about people listening, but I make people listen also. The other thing people tell me is, “You were able to show through the film, how we can have these conversations, how we can instead of just blocking our ears off and gazing the other way when an uncomfortable conversation pops up, you showed us how it is possible to listen.” Because the first thing they tell us in the US is no religion, no politics. It’s very much taboo, like don’t talk about issues that you disagree with the other person. Just don’t. 

Juliana Tafur: 

Don’t bring it up. And that is the major obstacle to understanding. If we can’t bring up an issue that we’re uncomfortable about to learn perspective, then how can we ever expect to advance as a society? 

Oscar Trimboli: 

What have you enjoyed most about making this movie and the process afterwards? 

Juliana Tafur: 

Through the film, I learned that listening was the solution, that listening was the way. It led me to title the film Listen, and it led me to realise how important listening is for everything we do in life. Not only talking about uncomfortable situations and facing people with opposing viewpoints, but how crucial it is for our relationships, for our leadership, for being better friends, better parents. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Juliana has created an important documentary, her ability to create a movie that helps people understand, how they listen and what they notice about their listening, how they listen to each other and what it means for their listening, and how to listen when you disagree. Did you notice some people struggle to make their point heard? And as a result, they become repetitive, like the Syrian discussing immigration. The role of a listener, it’s a lot like a book editor. It’s to help them make sense of what they’re thinking rather than what they’re saying. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Neutral questions, short circuit this repetition. And here’s a question you might like to use when you find somebody repeating over and over again the same point, could you take me back to when you first formed this perspective? Using this question, many people have been excited about what opens up when they discover when that person first formed this opinion. It created a willingness for their mind to be changed. I wonder what you’ll take out of today. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

I’d love to know, so send me an email. Email me at podcast@oscartrimboli.com. That’s podcast@oscartrimboli.com. I love reading your messages and listening to them, whether you send them to me via email or take the time to record a message just like this one. 

Trina: 

Hi, Oscar. This is Trina from Canada, and I’d like to share what’s been different for me since I read Deep Listening. I’d say I’m doing a much better job of being fully attentive in conversations, both at home and at work. And what I find is that means that I feel more connected with the person I’m speaking with, and I imagine they might feel the same way. I’ve also found that I’m noticing better when my attention drifts off and I’m able to bring it back faster now. 

Trina: 

That makes me feel more relaxed in a conversation, because I’m just in the moment and not thinking about what to say next or what’s for dinner or something else. The other side benefit of this, especially in professional conversations, is I find that I’m not taking notes as often because I’m fully attentive and absorbing what the person is saying to me. I’ve mentioned to you before that I’ve found I have been extraordinarily distracted since March came and COVID hit. Working with very young kids at home was a real challenge. 

Trina: 

And since they went back to school this fall, I’m much more conscious of how distracted I’ve been and how that’s led to some of the issues that you mentioned in Deep Listening. For instance, what could have been one email becomes two and so on. Your work came at a great time for me when I’ve been craving deep engagement and I’m feeling tired by multitasking. Two of the big learnings for me from your work so far is that I’m an interrupter. I learned this from your quiz that I did on your website, and I wouldn’t have thought of myself as an interrupter. 

Trina: 

But now since doing the quiz, I do notice I do interrupt people, especially when I get caught up in enthusiasm about something. And the second big learning I’ve taken from your work so far is that the first thing a person says isn’t necessarily the full expression of their thought, because we can’t speak as fast as our mind goes. It’s important when you’re speaking with someone to give them the space and the time to reconsider their idea, to add more information, and to think. You’ve taught me about the real importance of the pause. 

Trina: 

I couldn’t agree with that idea more, and I’m interested in becoming more comfortable with the pause. And in fact, that’s something I’d love to learn more from you about, as well as the art of understanding what’s going unsaid and bringing that to light. I’m an intuitive person, so I pick up on a lot of what goes unsaid, but I’d like to be more intentional about bringing that to light in a conversation. 

Trina: 

It’s such a skill and you really developed quite a phenomenal expertise in this art of listening, and you’ve shown me how deeply important that is. Thanks so much, Oscar. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Thanks, Trina, and keep practising with silence. This is an email I received from Kelly. Thank you so much, Kelly, for sending it to me. When it comes to listening, I struggle the most with interrupting the speaker. Furthermore, my planning of a response or what I want to say in advance while a person’s still speaking makes it a struggle for me. My mind is moving so quickly that oftentimes I find myself not really listening to the person. Instead, I’m trying to solve a problem. And sometimes I’m not sure there really is one. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

One thing you might choose to explore, are you listening to make sense of what they’re saying, or are you helping them to listen to what they’re thinking? When you notice this happen for you, just count in your mind in complete silence, one, one thousand, two, one thousand, three, one thousand, and they’ll either continue to speak. And if they don’t, just pose either of these two questions, tell me more or what else? By moving your mindset to a discussion rather than a solution, ironically you get to the solution quicker. 

Oscar Trimboli: 

Kelly, let me know how you go with these suggestions. I’m Oscar Trimboli, and I’m on a quest to create 100 million deep listeners in the world. You’ve given me the greatest gift of all. You’ve listened to me. Thanks for listening. 

Subscribe to the podcast